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Thread: Choose a strong password

  1. #1
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  2. #2
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    When you've chosen your password, you can check out how secure it is at the following sites:
    http://howsecureismypassword.net/
    https://www.microsoft.com/security/p...d-checker.aspx

  3. #3
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    Thanks JoeNinety They are good websites.


    "He (she) who does not prevent a crime when he(she) can, encourages it." Seneca

  4. #4
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    Thumbs up

    lol tested with the side .. out on my PW...

    Still on some points it can be improved..
    Repeated Pattern
    Repeated characters or patterns can make your password more predictable
    Possibly a Word

    Your password looks like it could be a dictionary word or a name.
    If it's a name with personal significance it might be easy to guess.
    If it's a dictionary word it could be cracked very quickly.
    Character Variety: Just Letters

    Your password only contains letters. Adding numbers and symbols can make your password more secure.
    Length: Long

    Your password is over 16 characters long. It should be pretty safe.
    But a hacker must have some free time to guess it..
    It would take a desktop PC
    About 53 duodecillion years
    to hack your password
    The improvement was adding a ! at the end, whats add a fuw more years to the crack time
    It would take a desktop PC
    About 15 quattuordecillion years
    to hack your password

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Look what it says about mine:

    It would take a desktop PC
    About 690 trillion years
    to hack your password

    Length: Long

    Your password is over 16 characters long. It should be pretty safe.
    and for another:

    It would take a desktop PC
    About 231 quintillion years
    to hack your password

    Length: Long

    Your password is over 16 characters long. It should be pretty safe.

    Anyway...I will continue changing my password frequently. We know that scammers work in teams and full time.... LOL

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    I change my password as frequently as possible and add special characters into it. Upon checking my password, it says that it will take 98 million years to crack it.
    A penny saved is a penny earned. - Benjamin Franklin

  7. #7
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    I am living alone in my house, but my notebook has very, very strong passwords for all, lots of.....! I have saved nothing, except in my mind.
    "Man sollte immer wissen, was man sagt, aber nicht immer sagen, was man weiß."
    Matthias Claudius 1740 - 1815

  8. #8
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    Another site is: https://shouldichangemypassword.com/
    It will let you see if your email features on any of the (known) leaked password lists produced by hackers. It has a 10-step guide telling you what to do if you have been compromised.

  9. #9
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    Thanks to our members for the tips.
    It is a very wise move to REGULARLY change our passwords. There are a lot of people on the internet who would like to have our passwords so changing them is always a good move.

    A "safe" password is usually at least 15 characters long,

    A 15-character password composed only of random letters and numbers is about 33,000 times stronger than an 8-character password composed of characters from the entire keyboard.

    The safest way is to use a combination of letters AND numbers.

    One of the best ways to help protect ourselves is to REGULARLY change our passwords.

    Contrary to popular opinion it is ok to write down our passwords so we can remember them, PROVIDED this information is kept safe and secure.

    Instructions on how to change the password in windows XP:
    http://www.microsoft.com/resources/d....mspx?mfr=true

    Instructions on how to change the password in windows VISTA:
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/w...ndows-password

    Instructions on how to change the password in Windows 7:
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/w...ndows-password
    *What the mind can conceive and believe, it can achieve.*

    "The law in the book can go byte itself in the ass. Watch it byte mine!" - Chandra Sekhar Sathyadas.

  10. #10
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    "Password" unseated by "123456" on SplashData`s annual "Worst Passwords" list

    http://splashdata.com/press/worstpasswords2013.htm

    "Password" unseated by "123456" on SplashData's annual "Worst Passwords" list

    Worst Passwords of 2013 listThe 2013 list of worst passwords, influenced by postings from the Adobe breach, demonstrates the importance of not basing passwords on the application or website being accessed

    LOS GATOS, CA – SplashData has announced its annual list of the 25 most common passwords found on the Internet. For the first time since SplashData began compiling its annual list, "password" has lost its title as the most common and therefore Worst Password, and two-time runner-up "123456" took the dubious honor. "Password" fell to #2.

    According to SplashData, this year's list was influenced by the large number of passwords from Adobe users posted online by security consulting firm Stricture Consulting Group following Adobe's well publicized security breach.

    "Seeing passwords like 'adobe123' and 'photoshop' on this list offers a good reminder not to base your password on the name of the website or application you are accessing," says Morgan Slain, CEO of SplashData.

    SplashData's list of frequently used passwords shows that many people continue to put themselves at risk by using weak, easily guessable passwords. Some other passwords in the Top Ten include "qwerty," "abc123," "111111," and "iloveyou."

    "Another interesting aspect of this year's list is that more short numerical passwords showed up even though websites are starting to enforce stronger password policies," Slain said. For example, new to this year's list are simple and easily guessable passwords like "1234" at #16, "12345" at #20, and "000000" at #25.

    SplashData, provider of the SplashID Safe line of password management applications, releases its annual list in an effort to encourage the adoption of stronger passwords. "As always, we hope that with more publicity about how risky it is to use weak passwords, more people will start taking simple steps to protect themselves by using stronger passwords and using different passwords for different websites."

    Presenting SplashData's "Worst Passwords of 2013":

    Rank
    Password
    Change from 2012

    1
    123456
    Up 1
    2
    password
    Down 1
    3
    12345678
    Unchanged
    4
    qwerty
    Up 1
    5
    abc123
    Down 1
    6
    123456789
    New
    7
    111111
    Up 2
    8
    1234567
    Up 5
    9
    iloveyou
    Up 2
    10
    adobe123
    New
    11
    123123
    Up 5
    12
    admin
    New
    13
    1234567890
    New
    14
    letmein
    Down 7
    15
    photoshop
    New
    16
    1234
    New
    17
    monkey
    Down 11
    18
    shadow
    Unchanged
    19
    sunshine
    Down 5
    20
    12345
    New
    21
    password1
    Up 4
    22
    princess
    New
    23
    azerty
    New
    24
    trustno1
    Down 12
    25
    000000
    New

    SplashData's top 25 list was compiled from files containing millions of stolen passwords posted online during the previous year. The company advises consumers or businesses using any of the passwords on the list to change them immediately.

    SplashData suggests making passwords more secure with these tips:

    Use passwords of eight characters or more with mixed types of characters. But even passwords with common substitutions like "dr4mat1c" can be vulnerable to attackers' increasingly sophisticated technology, and random combinations like "j%7K&yPx$" can be difficult to remember. One way to create more secure passwords that are easy to recall is to use passphrases -- short words with spaces or other characters separating them. It's best to use random words rather than common phrases. For example, "cakes years birthday" or "smiles_light_skip?"
    Avoid using the same username/password combination for multiple websites. Especially risky is using the same password for entertainment sites that you do for online email, social networking, or financial service sites. Use different passwords for each new website or service you sign up for.

    Having trouble remembering all those different strong passwords? Try using a password manager application that organizes and protects passwords and can automatically log you into websites. There are numerous applications available, but choose one with a strong track record of reliability and security like SplashID Safe, which has a 10 year history and over 1 million users. SplashID Safe has versions available for Windows and Mac as well as smartphones and tablet devices.

    About SplashData, Inc.

    SplashData has been a leading provider of password management applications for over 10 years. SplashID Safe (www.splashid.com) has grown to be most trusted multi-platform password solution for both the consumer and enterprise markets with over 1 million users worldwide. SplashID Safe's popularity continues to rise as the number of user names, passwords, and account numbers most people have to remember is rapidly multiplying. At the same time, the risk of this kind of sensitive information falling into the wrong hands has never been greater. SplashID Safe helps solve this dilemma by creating an encrypted digital safe available on smartphones, computers, USB keys, or online, offering the peace of mind of being able to access critical information whenever needed while maintaining the security of 256-bit encryption. SplashData was founded in 2000 and is based in Los Gatos, CA.

    Press Contact:

    Kevin Doel
    TalonPR, Inc.
    785-273-9660
    kevin@talonpr.com
    "Man sollte immer wissen, was man sagt, aber nicht immer sagen, was man weiß."
    Matthias Claudius 1740 - 1815

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